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4 Major Developments In Vaccine Research

Written by: Dr. Jeff JacqmeinAs we are beginning to prepare for vaccine season here at ENCORE Research now is a great time to inform you of some of the recent advancements in the field. There are many vaccines in the pipeline (http://www.who.int/immunization/diseases/en/) and with volunteers like you we look forward to helping bring them to market.  I have selected fou...

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I can’t take my statin, what now?

If you have high cholesterol you may dread going to your doctor, especially if they are going to complete a cholesterol blood test. You know they prescribed a statin, but the muscle cramping you experience after taking it just isn’t worth it. How do you tell your doctor that the medication they prescribed just isn’t working for you? You are not alone, and there are options available for you.We all know that having excess cho...

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600,000 American Newborns at Risk Annually?

Changes in mood are very common after childbirth. In fact, many new moms experience what is often called the baby blues, which can include mood swings, crying episodes, difficulty sleeping and anxiety. Baby blues usually only lasts up to a few weeks.  However, feeling intensely depressed, overwhelmed, or anxious, could be something called postpartum depression, or PPD.  Read More

Over 50? Here Is Why You Should Be Concerned About Deadly Diarrhea and C. Diff!

Ask anyone who has had a Clostridium difficile (C. difficile, or C. diff) infection and they will probably tell you that it was one of the worst experiences of their life. Imagine the worst flu you’ve ever had but on steroids! C. diff is affectionately referred to as “deadly diarrhea” and with symptoms such as watery diarrhea 10 to 15 times a day that’s no joke! It can also come with a mul...

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New Biologics for Psoriasis & Psoriatic Arthritis

Medical progress has made the lives of folks with autoimmune conditions such as psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) better than ever before.  These conditions have been extremely difficult to treat successfully in the past.  Now thanks to advancements in medicine using biological agents more people are living free of psoriasis and PsA flare ups.Psoriasis is most commonly known for the raised, white or greyish patches that ...

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Results Up to 4 Years From the Open-Label OSLER-1 Extension Study

THE RESULTS ARE IN! We would like to wish a big heartfelt THANK YOU to all our volunteers that participated in this international (PCSK9) high cholesterol study of 1300 volunteers completed in 18 countries. Jacksonville FL volunteers lead the world in this study with ground...

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Rogue Immune Cells, An Autoimmune Story

When patients are diagnosed with an autoimmune disorder they often have many questions. How did this happen? What is happening inside me? What treatments are available? Autoimmune diseases can be extremely complex and are the subject of much current research. The immune system’s purpose is to identify and destroy threats to the body such as viruses, bacteria or parasites. However, when a person has an autoimmune disease such as Crohn&rsq...

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New Year - Message from the CEO

I recently stumbled across the work of Professor John Norcross, the “undisputed” guru on all matters related to New Year’s resolutions. Who knew? I guess a guru may exist for nearly all things. Professor Norcross surveyed and followed a few hundred folks who made New Year’s resolutions and compared them to those who did not commit themselves to goals as the calendar year turned.Here are a few fun facts from the P...

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New Year's Resolutions

As each year comes and goes we seem to go through the same cycle. We end the year by reflecting on what we accomplished (or didn’t) over the course of the past year and how we can improve over the next year. Many of us set specific goals which we call our ‘New Year’s Resolutions’. These goals range from budgeting to personal growth to accomplishing a specific task. One topic we all seem ...

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Why Our Volunteers Love Clinical Trials

Why do our volunteers want to participate in clinical trials?  Volunteers are often motivated by a combination of several reasons. Here are 6 of the top reasons to participate. 1.        The potential of finding relief from their symptoms<...

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A Short History of Diabetes

As I was perusing an ancient text I came across an excerpt on the disease known as diabetes.  The earliest mention of the disease I could find was by a Greek physician called Aretaeus in the first century AD.  Aretaeus identified diabetes and named it after its symptoms of thirst and sweet urine.  When I researched the period I was astounded to find the diagnosing physicians were called “wate...

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Dropping the Hammer on Cholesterol

Heart disease currently accounts for 1 in 4 deaths in the United States.[1] However due to new research breakthroughs there are now treatments available that may finally give us the means to fight back against heart dise...

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An Apple A Day Does Not Keep The Doctor Away

Growing up, we’ve all heard the saying, “An apple a day, keeps the doctor away” and in most cases, an apple is a great fruit to eat! Read More

What Defines Medical Excellence?

The practice of medicine has changed in major ways in recent years. Though many of these changes reflect good intentions, the real world consequences to patients often don’t match expectations. To understand this divide between reasonable intentions and the less salubrious reality from which we may collectively suffer, I’d like to share a recent anecdote that occurred at the airport when regulations r...

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Guinea Pigs vs. Research Heroes

Let’s not dance around the issue: for many years now, news sources like CBS, CNN, The Atlantic, and The New Yorker have called research volunteers guinea pigs.  You've probably said it yourself. I'm here today to tell you why we need to call research volunteers by another name: Heroes.The term “guinea pig” is condescending to both volunteers and ...

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My First Time: Confessions of a Research Virgin

Recently, I had my first experience as a clinical research volunteer. Going in, I wasn't quite sure what to expect, but it was better than I thought! I have Multiple Sclerosis. I also have asthma, arthritis, hypothyroidism, high blood pressure, and migraines. I live with chronic pain, I've had multiple surgeries, and the list goes on. With all these illnesses and...

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Migraines...Information Overload?

Incredibly, migraines are the third most prevalent disease, and the sixth most disabling disease in the world. In the US alone, 18% of women, 6 % of men, and 10 % of children experience migraines. It comes as no surprise that 1 in 4 US households include a migraine sufferer.Why are migraines a big deal? Unlike normal episodic headaches, migraines are a chronic disease ...

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Rheumatoid Arthritis

Writen by: Mike Mass, MDRheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that is localized in the joints but may also result in serious systemic symptoms. In the joints, RA begins in the lining tissue known as synovium.  In RA inflammatory cells are stimulated in the synovium and release substances that will both ...

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Vaccine Research Has Worldwide Effects

Dr. Dan here; this month of June I am leaving my desk and going out in the field to work as a volunteer physician on several different islands. First, I will be travelling to the Republic of Vanuatu, located in the South Pacific.  Luckily for me the last recorded case of cannibalism in Vanuatu occurred in 1969, so that should not be a problem! Unfortunately, mosquito b...

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Alzheimer’s disease, Horizons and Hope

Alzheimer’s disease is a degenerative brain disorder that was first described in 1906 by Dr. Alois Alzheimer.  Since that time, Alzheimer’s disease has become the most common cause of dementia (accounting for 60-80% of cases).  It is estimated that in 2016, 5.4 million American’s of all ages have Alzheimer’s disease.  One in nine people age 65 and older has Alzheimer’s...

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Dementia Related to Over-the-counter Medications

Memory issues occur commonly and when they begin, one may worry about the onset of Alzheimer’s disease.  While Alzheimer’s may cause memory loss, memory loss is also a symptom of many reversible conditions. Early memory testing is crucial to determine the cause of memory loss to help reverse it before it becomes permanent. Read More

3 Ways to Survive the Diabetic Tsunami

The word “tsunami” describes a huge wave caused by an underground disturbance.  Diabetes falls under that definition in our view.   According to a study in Diabetes and Endocrinology, two out of five American adults may develop Type II Diabetes in their lifetime.  About 95% of US diabetics are Type II. Type II diabetes occurs due to a condition of insulin resi...

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Metformin: A Common Diabetic Drug That Increases Longevity

Many doctors prescribe metformin to diabetic patients. Doctors trust the drug, particularly since the landmark United Kingdom Prospective Study that showed that overweight Type 2 diabetics on metformin lived longer and suffered fewer heart attacks than those with the same blood glucose levels achieved using insulin. The history of metformin provides a good example of how an unusual herb can become a powerful trea...

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Are You Still Using Ancient Medicine for Arthritis?

Joint pain is an ancient disease. Dinosaur skeletons, cavemen remains, and ancient Egyptian mummies all have evidence of it. In 1886 an English doctor named John Kent Spender coined the term “osteoarthritis” (OA) which led to the modern understanding of the disease.      To relieve the pain and...

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